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I just bought a pedometer that came with a book that recommends you do 10,000 steps a day to be healthy. OK- but how many miles is that? I live in NYC and walk a lot, and was wondering if anyone had experience with this. Obviously, I don't expect an exact number, maybe just a range?


Sat. Mar 4, 9:39am

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I think it is between 3.5 and 4 miles from different things that I have read. :)


Saturday, March 04, 2006, 9:57 AM

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The quickest way for you to figure that out is to go outside and walk one exact street block above 14th Street. You probably know that 20 blocks = 1 mile, so go out and walk a block, crossing one street (i.e. from south corner to south corner) because the width of that street is included in the mile measurement. Multiply the number of paces by 20 and you've got your answer.

For others, you've got a few options:

(1) mark out a starting and finishing line for a specific distance and count your steps between the two (not a great solution, since you will probably be to conscious of the experiment to walk naturally).

(2) walk on a treadmill and base it on the distance covered

(3) go use a measured track at, say, a high school and use the starting line, finish line, and stay in your lane. It's usually 1/4 mile, and you can extrapolate from that.

Saturday, March 04, 2006, 10:04 AM

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Wait - 10 blocks is a mile ! This is from an MSN on-online article about walking:

What does 10-K steps equal? Is it really five miles?
Yes. That's using the estimate that 2,000 steps equals about one mile, or 5,280 feet.

How many steps around a standard-sized city block?
Ten city blocks equal around a mile — approximately 2,000 steps equal a mile. Given those numbers, one block is roughly 200 steps.


Saturday, March 04, 2006, 5:40 PM

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If I remember correctly, about 200-225 steps = 1/10 of a mile for me, so about 2000-2250 is roughly a mile. :-)

Saturday, March 04, 2006, 6:13 PM

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2000 steps in a mile

10 standard city blocks might be a mile, but in NYC, you need to walk 20 short blocks (eg 20th street to 40th street) or approximately 8 long blocks (eg 5th ave to 11th ave) for a mile.

Use this link for verification:

For me, I happen to know that my normal stride is approximately 2.5 feet, just under a yard. This works out to 2112 steps in a mile (5280 feet), or 4.73 miles in 10000 steps. I am 5'8".


Sunday, March 05, 2006, 8:05 PM

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An average of 2000 steps is a mile, and 8 standard city blocks is 1 mile.

Saturday, March 18, 2006, 9:20 AM

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re: Steps in a Mile

There are roughly 2,000 steps in a mile, although it varies on how tall you are because of your stride. So if you walk 10,000 steps in a day, you are walking about 5 miles. On average, Americans walk about 2,000-2,500 steps in a day. It will require some extra effort to get to 10,000. Good luck!

Wednesday, June 27, 2007, 2:23 PM

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In Chicago, it's definitely 8 blocks to a mile. In New York, the short blocks are much shorter than a Chicago block, and the long blocks are much longer. I do a lot of walking in both cities.

Wednesday, June 27, 2007, 2:26 PM

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Best pedometer

Hi, I use the New Lifestyles Digi-Walker Style SW-651. They have other styles as well. You get a booklet with the pedometer to help you. Although for many people 2000 steps equal 1 mile it really depends on the length of your stride. In the booklet they tell you how to measure your stride and set the pedometer to your stride length. Happy Walking!!!!


Monday, July 02, 2007, 2:03 PM

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I'm a 5-11 guy and have mine set for 32 inch stride (1980 steps/mile) which matches up pretty well to measured distance when I'm walking a mile on city streets. I'd expect that on average, women will have a shorter stride. But anyone's stride length is longer if you're moving briskly in an unobstructed space, and shorter if you're making your way through a crowd in the subway station, or in an office, etc., where you just don't move as briskly. So you might want to adjust it to a shorter stride length if a lot of your walking is in places where you can't just breeze right along.

Monday, July 02, 2007, 3:43 PM

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