CommunityBrowse groupsBlogEtiquetteInvite Your friendsSuccess Stories

Lounge
Community 


Why Is Nutrient Density Important?



Nutrient per calorie density is important in devising and recommending menu plans and dietary suggestions for the most effective approach for both weight loss and for preventing and reversing disease.

Low nutrient eating leads to cellular toxicity which causes addictive withdrawal symptoms (toxic hunger) which results in more frequent desire for food and overeating. 

All three factors: nutrients, volume, and calories effect eating drives and satiation, thus explaining overeating behavior.


Tue. May 8, 2:53pm

Add comment  
Most importantly- you can eat As Much As You Want!!! all the foods on this list, you basically cannot get fat no matter how much you eat.


Kale 1000
Collards 876
Spinach 853
Bok Choy 803
Romaine 452
Boston 412
Broccoli 376
Artichoke 334
Cabbage 329
Green Pepper 295
Carrots 273
Asparagus 269
Strawberry 245
Cauliflower 261
Tomato 187
Cherries 188
Blueberries 150
Iceberg 133
Flax Seeds 131
Orange 124
Cantaloupe 117
Apple 87
Peach 84
Kidney Beans 81
Green Peas 80
Sweet Potato 77
Soybeans 77
Pineapple 74
Salmon 71
Tofu 71
Lentils 69
Walnuts 63 Sunflower Seeds 62
Mango 59
Cucumber 57
Oatmeal 53
White Potato 51
Shrimp 51
Brown Rice 46
Skim Milk 41
Grapes 38
Avocado 37



Tuesday, May 08, 2007, 2:57 PM

Add comment
What do the numbers after the foods represent? Evidently a measure of nutrient density/nutrients per calorie, but how is the precise number determined?

Tuesday, May 08, 2007, 3:25 PM

Add comment
OP here- I am not sure- it is from Eat to Live. My guess is that this represents the total number of vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, antioxidants. All that good stuff.

Tuesday, May 08, 2007, 3:54 PM

Add comment
maybe i'm wrong, but the OP's posting reads like it was copied from a book. was it? would you reveal your reference material, please?

Tuesday, May 08, 2007, 4:12 PM

Add comment
to the 4:12 poster the op did reveal the source. its from Eat to live. I too am reading the book. Its very interesting. It basically talks about the relations to foods and diseases and how there is more nutrients in plant based foods. did you know there is more protein in brocoli than a piece of steak? I didn't. it was a real eye opener to hear some of the things in this book.

Tuesday, May 08, 2007, 5:18 PM

Add comment
The question of which has more protein, broccoli or steak, is interesting, but you have to know the unit in which the protein is being measured. In this case, it's per 100 calories. That is, 100 calories of broccoli has a bit more protein than 100 calories of steak. But six *ounces* of broccoli has MUCH less protein than six ounces of steak.

But 100 calories of broccoli is over three cups. I like broccoli but I don't think I can eat enough of it to get the amount of protein I need every day! And that's only a partial protein--plant sources are never complete in themselves. There are two "parts" to a whole protein (to make this really, really simple), and no one plant source has both. So you have to combine the plants containing one part or type with plant sources containing the other part.



Tuesday, May 08, 2007, 10:19 PM

Add comment
The question of which has more protein, broccoli or steak, is interesting, but you have to know the unit in which the protein is being measured. In this case, it's per 100 calories. That is, 100 calories of broccoli has a bit more protein than 100 calories of steak. But six *ounces* of broccoli has MUCH less protein than six ounces of steak.

But 100 calories of broccoli is over three cups. I like broccoli but I don't think I can eat enough of it to get the amount of protein I need every day! And that's only a partial protein--plant sources are never complete in themselves. There are two "parts" to a whole protein (to make this really, really simple), and no one plant source has both. So you have to combine the plants containing one part or type with plant sources containing the other part.



Tuesday, May 08, 2007, 10:19 PM

Add comment
Sorry about the dbl post--I made a correction and it posted both versions.

Tuesday, May 08, 2007, 10:20 PM

Add comment
Mm, I believe you're referring to "complete proteins". Meat/dairy proteins are all complete. With other proteins, I think "completeness" is accomplished by combining a vegetable or legume with a starch, e.g. rice and beans, and refers to the enzyme/amino acid content - there are some that our bodies produce and some that must be obtained from dietary sources (known as "essential amino acids"). It's the kind of info that the labels on enormous vats of whey protein powder shout about, and they are all preceded by "L-", like "L-Tryptophan" and "L-Lysine".

Wednesday, May 09, 2007, 12:20 AM

Add comment
thanks for that info. I am still reading the book, I definately dont have all the answers, but Im enjoying this learning process.

Wednesday, May 09, 2007, 4:43 AM

Add comment
The issue of protein is just an excuse for people to keep consuming the high fat foods they are addicted to. The bottom line is that diets like Eat to Live and Okinawa diet represent the antithesis to the traditional American diet. Both essentially recommend eating mostly vegetable sources. The folks in Okinawa who live until 100 average about 58 percent calories from vegetable sources. They eat fish. Meat and Dairy as a percentage of their diet is almost non exisitent.

Wednesday, May 09, 2007, 7:38 AM

Add comment
i think one should mention that they are referencing material from someone else's book / research when posting material from someone else. not just because of copyright laws but because it gives others a point of reference and allows us to look up more information on our own. for example, i would not have known that the original post and the vegetable / numbers list was from a book unless someone asked and the op decided to answer. now knowing that, i can go look up what the numbers represent and how i can put that information to use in my meal plans.

Wednesday, May 09, 2007, 9:17 AM

Add comment
10:19 PM

While it takes a lot of broccoli volume to equal the calories and protein gms of meat, this is kind of the whole point. If you think about this the other way round, it is far too easy to consume too many calories and too much protein and fat when eating meat rather than something bulky like vegetables. High veg diet = high nutrients and satiety. High meat diet = tons of fat, cholesterol and low satiety per calorie.

On the issue of complete vs. incomplete protein - The idea that you have to carefully and exactly combine complementary proteins has been turned over long since. The body is able to store amino acids for a period of time until needed, and so unless you consistently eat a very limited variety diet, things even out all on there own.

Protein deficiency is incredibly rare in the US and developed countries. Even elsewhere it is almost always associated with calorie deficiency to the point of starvation, or mono-diets of a single grain. What most people in the developed world suffer from is protein, calorie, fat, etc. etc. excess.

Wednesday, May 09, 2007, 9:43 AM

Add comment
The other issue on eating vegetables for protein (and all the other good thing in them) is that of course no one would try to get all their protein from a diet of nothing but broccoli. Any more than one should try to get all their nutrients from steak. (although honestly, you'd have better luck with the broccoli. try finding vitamin C in steak) That would be boring as hell.

A plant centered diet is going to include the broccoli along with peas, spinach, lettuce, collards, beans, sweet potatoes, artichokes, tomatoes, asparagus, apples, oranges, berries, peanuts, walnuts, rice and etc. and etc. through the entire plant kingdom. A plant centered diet not only is more filling, but is often much more varied and interesting than a meat centered diet.

Wednesday, May 09, 2007, 10:01 AM

Add comment
haven't you heard of "101 Ways to Cook Chicken" ?

Wednesday, May 09, 2007, 10:03 AM

Add comment
Nah, I'm too busy reading 125 Things to Do with a Black-eyed Pea.

Wednesday, May 09, 2007, 1:21 PM

Add comment
is that an unauthorized biography of fergie?

Wednesday, May 09, 2007, 1:34 PM

Add comment
Apparently I don't keep up with the Royals enough. What does fergie do with black-eyed peas (or is it suitable for a family dieting site)?

I was kinda thinking of Hoppin' John and Texas Caviar.

Wednesday, May 09, 2007, 2:05 PM

Add comment
Fergie now conjures up images of a wretched pop singer in a group called the Black-Eyed Peas. In other words, 1:21 made a funny.

Wednesday, May 09, 2007, 5:39 PM

Add comment
I wanna go down like Londy londy londy...

Wednesday, May 09, 2007, 5:45 PM

Add comment
Looking around on the Eat to Live website, I found the page where the nutrient density scores listed above come from, and also more of an explanation of how the score is obtained. Here's the explanation and a link to the page.

"Dr. Fuhrman's Nutrient Density Scoring System1

To determine the scores above all known vitamins and minerals were considered and added in. Nutrient Data from Nutritionist Pro software for each food item was obtained for the amount of that food that would provide a 1000 calorie serving. We included the following nutrients in the evaluation: Calcium, Carotenoids: Beta Carotene, Alpha Carotene, Lutein & Zeaxanthin, Lycopene, Fiber, Folate, Glucosinolates, Iron, Magnesium, Niacin, Selenium, Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin), Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Zinc, plus ORAC score X 2 (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity is a method of measuring the antioxidant or radical scavenging capacity of foods).

Nutrient quantities, which are normally in many different measurements (mg, mcg, IU) were converted to a percentage of their RDI so that a common value could be considered for each nutrient. Since there is currently no RDI for Carotenoids, Glucosinolates, or ORAC score, goals were established based on available research and current understanding of the benefits of these factors. (limited references below). The % RDI or Goal for each nutrient which the USDA publishes a value for was added together to give a total. All nutrients were weighted equally with a factor of one except for the foods ORAC score. The ORAC score was given a factor 2 (as if it were two nutrients) due to the importance of antioxidant nutrients so that measurement of unnamed anti-oxidant phytochemicals were represented in the scoring. The sum of the food’s total nutrient value was then multiplied by a fraction to make the highest number equal 1000 so that all foods could be considered on a numerical scale of 1 to 1000.

1 Dr. Fuhrman's nutrient density food rankings, scoring system, and point determinations of foods is patent pending." "

Link

Thursday, May 10, 2007, 12:07 PM

Add comment

Next: Click Here For Recipes That Help You Lose Weight
New: The PEERtrainer Cheat System
The PEERtrainer Cheat System is a new, simple to follow system for eating. The objective is to help guide you towards a way of eating that will make it easier to lose weight, give you more energy and help you feel better. It is free, easy to follow, and a little unusual and controversial. Most of all it is working. This link will take you to a blog post where you can download a FREE copy of the Cheat System Diet Cookbook! The Cheat System has also been turned into a major book to be published May 6th, 2014. According to Srini Pillay, MD, Harvard Medical School: "It works in a real way with how human psychology works...I love that it relates closely to how the brain likes to function... without crazy effort and with significant short-term gains."
Here is a preview of the cover:

Cheatcover

You can get started on the system for free by clicking on this banner:

peertrainer cheat system

"Gives you the template to lose weight without sending your hormones in a disastrous death spiral."

-Sara Gottfried, MD, NY Times Best Selling Author

"The Cheat System Diet is brilliant! Jackie Wicks understands how the brain works, and how habits are developed in the real world."

--Steven Masley, MD, Assistant Professor University South Florida

 






Explore Related Articles
Weight Loss Motivation   Sustainable Weight Loss
Weight Lifting    Hypnosis and Weight Loss
Emotional Eating   Help Losing Weight
Free Weight Loss Program   Weight Watchers Points  NutriSystem
How To Change Anything

weight loss coaching


New Services and Offerings From PEERtrainer:

1) How To Achieve Sustainable Weight Loss This is a new 12 week program that helps you solve the mental blockages that are prevent many from sustainable weight loss. The most interesting thing about the program is what participants are saying and you can click on the link to read them.

2) Tip Of The Day Weight Loss Coaching Program-- This is a daily email program that helps to reinforce fundamentals as well as gives you practical tips each day. We are getting GREAT feedback from subscribers.

3) What Are Your Odds Of Losing Weight?-- Take the PEERtrainer Coaching Quiz Now!

4) Tip Of The Day Blog-- We update this each day with responses to specific questions from our coaching subscribers and customer.

5) New Diet and Weight Loss Content-- We have launched a new diet section that organizes the growing amount of content on the site. When you click in the most important areas are highlighted.









Related Content:

How To Lose Weight- The Basics
Weight Watchers Points System
The Fat Smash Diet
The Eat To Live Diet
The Beck Diet Solution
How To Get The Motivation To Lose Weight

 

How To Be Successful Using PEERtrainer

How To Burn Fat
Online Weight Loss Support- How It Works
Does Green Tea Help You Lose Weight?
Tips On Using PEERtrainer
Visit The PEERtrainer Community
Diet and Fitness Resources

Fitness

Weight Watchers Meetings
Learning To Inspire Others: You Already Are
Writing Down Your Daily Workouts
Spending Money On A Personal Trainer?
How I Became A Marathon Runner

 

Preventive Health

How To Prevent Injuries During Your Workout
Flu Season: Should You Take The Flu Shot?
Are You Really Ready To Start PEERtrainer?
Super Foods That Can Boost Your Energy
Reversing Disease Through Nutrition

New Diet and Fitness Articles:

Weight Watchers Points Plus
How To Adjust Your Body To Exercise
New: Weight Watchers Momentum Program
New: PEERtrainer Blog Archive
Review Of The New Weight Watchers Momentum Program
 

Weight Loss Motivation by Joshua Wayne:

Why Simple Goal Setting Is Not Enough
How To Delay Short Term Gratification
How To Stay Motivated
How To Exercise With A Busy Schedule

Real World Nutrition and Fitness Questions

Can Weight Lifting Help You Lose Weight?
Are Protein Drinks Safe?
Nutrition As Medicine?
 

Everyday Weight Loss Tips

How To Eat Healthy At A Party
How To Eat Out And Still Lose Weight
The Three Bite Rule
Tips On How To Stop A Binge






PEERtrainer Is A Free and Powerful Online System For
Weight Loss Support

Click Here To Learn More and Join!